Arthur Conan Doyle – The Hound of the Baskervilles

”Mr Sherlock Holmes, who was usually very late in the mornings, save upon those not infrequent occasions when he stayed up all night, was seated at the breakfast table.” 

Sherlock Holmes and Dr Watson are called to Devonshire, where Sir Charles Baskerville has been found dead on the moor. How he died does however seem to be unclear, as a rumour is spread about him having died because of something supernatural. A giant dog?
Dr Watson accompanies the heir of Sir Charles Baskerville to Devonshire to find out more… Is there a curse on the Baskerville family?

There is one simple reason as to why I decided to read this book. Last summer I spent some time in England, and actually went to Dartmoor, the moor where “The Hound of the Baskervilles” takes place. A couple of days later, I happened upon this book for 99 pence, and naturally I bought it.

This was the first book I’ve read about Sherlock Holmes, and I really enjoyed Doyle’s story. Above all I liked the language. The words. The phrasing. The dialogues. One reason for reading classics is the language. Usually it’s just amazing. A bit difficult at times, but nothing you can’t handle.
The dialogues between Holmes and Watson, or between Watson and Sir Henry Baskerville, or between any of the characters, are a pleasure to read. People should talk like that!

It was a good book, but I doubt I’ll run to the library looking for more books about Sherlock Holmes any time soon. I usually don’t read many crime novels, but I’m glad I read this one, and it was definitely worth the effort.

I guess classics are classics for a reason, I don’t think I’ve ever read a classic that I haven’t enjoyed. (Except maybe for Don Quijote…)

Title: The Hound of the Baskervilles
Author: Arthur Conan Doyle
First published: 1901-1902 in The Strand Magazine
Harper Collins

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